Brilliant Noise, 2006, Single channel DVD 5:55 min., made at the NASA Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, California, USA, film still,
© the artists
Brilliant Noise, 2006, Single channel DVD 5:55 min., made at the NASA Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, California, USA, film still,
© the artists
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England
Earthmoves, 2006, SD video, 4.30 min.,
© the artists, commissioned by Arts Council England

SemiconductorEarthmoves and Brilliant Noise

 

Earth Moves is a continuation of Semiconductor’s exploration into how unseen forces affect the fabric of our world. The limits of human perception are exposed, revealing a world which is unstable and in a constant state of animation as the forces of acoustic waves come into play on our surroundings. Here the south-east of England is explored through a series of five audio-controlled photographic panoramas. For this work, Semiconductor collected sound recordings and photographs on location at the A23 at Pease Pottage; Witterings NT reserve; Findon Valley; John St Brighton and Adur Valley cement factory. The sounds were used to re-animate the landscape at each location. Another work, Brilliant Noise, takes us into the data vaults of solar astronomy. After sifting through hundreds of thousands of computer files, made accessible via open access archives, Semiconductor have brought together some of the sun's finest unseen moments. The soundtrack highlights the hidden forces at play upon the solar surface, by directly translating areas of intensity within the image brightness into layers of audio manipulation and radio frequencies.

Semiconductor