November, 2010,
model (various materials), 180 x 240 x 140 cm, photographs, each 30 x 40 cm, drawing, 30 x 40 cm,
© and courtesy the artist
November, 2010,
model (various materials), 180 x 240 x 140 cm, photographs, each 30 x 40 cm, drawing, 30 x 40 cm,
© and courtesy the artist
November, 2010,
model (various materials), 180 x 240 x 140 cm, photographs, each 30 x 40 cm, drawing, 30 x 40 cm,
© and courtesy the artist
November, 2010,
model (various materials), 180 x 240 x 140 cm, photographs, each 30 x 40 cm, drawing, 30 x 40 cm,
© and courtesy the artist

Daniel LeidenfrostAnd it’s hard to hold a candle

 

In its original composition, the series of works Daniel Leidenfrost titled November contains both representation and its objects, both elements that show and elements to be shown. Leidenfrost builds model architectures and landscapes that serve as motifs for his photographs and yet, in being depicted, turn into works in their own right. The model itself remains an integral part of the whole, though it is difficult to access and comprehend. The setting radically reveals the structures and conditions of production, reflecting both their genesis with the underlying aspiration to veracity and the materiality and functionality of the media involved. The remarkable feature of this process of production is an atmospheric transfer; if the models deliberately rely on the charm of hobbyesque handcrafted objects, suggesting lonely evenings spent over a model railroad in a basement room, the photographs engender sensations and impressions that recall other places we unconsciously recognise. The effect is intimately familiar and strange at once – places that are dense with sensations (Peter Assmann, K wie Kunst (Salzburg: Müry Salzmann, 2011), p. 37) and obscure recollections of perceptions, like a dream. The works raise urgent and fundamental questions concerning truth, construction and cognition.

Manfred Wiplinger